"Stressors are information"

Carlos Delgado [CC BY-SA 4.0 (https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-sa/4.0)], from Wikimedia Commons    “Fatigue crack in a piece of steel. Fatigue occurs when a material is  subjected to repeated loading and unloading.In this image, two different  zones can be observed. At right, there are striations, related to the  slow and progressive crack growth. At left, granular area due to sudden  fracture, once the critical size of the crack has been reached. “

Carlos Delgado [CC BY-SA 4.0 (https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-sa/4.0)], from Wikimedia Commons

“Fatigue crack in a piece of steel. Fatigue occurs when a material is subjected to repeated loading and unloading.In this image, two different zones can be observed. At right, there are striations, related to the slow and progressive crack growth. At left, granular area due to sudden fracture, once the critical size of the crack has been reached. “

As Nassim Taleb says in his excellent book ‘Antifragile’, ‘stressors are information’.

That means that rather than just get stressed by them, you can use them to direct improvement.

For example, when ‘exceptions’ start to become common, it’s a sign that something in your system needs to change in line with the environment.

A good place to start is by asking “How could I pre-empt this situation?”.

Kirsten Gibbs